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Advertising covers

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TheCoverCollector
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#21

Post by TheCoverCollector »

From the foods collection is another cover from a fruit grower, this one in Texas. Alamo,Texas, is just east of McAllen and in the Rio Grande Valley. The "Magic Valley" is an area long noted for its superior agricultural products. This cover may have carried a price list to a potential customer. Little philatelic value with its ubiquitous 3c Prexie stamp, but highly collectable for its colorful advertising on both sides.

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#22

Post by TheCoverCollector »

I've been writing-up recent acquisitions for my cover collection and this is the latest effort. It is a 1913 illustrated cover from the Dalton Adding Machine Company of Popular Bluff, Missouri.

Dalton's was a big business in a small town. Popular Bluff is the county seat of Butler County and has a current population of a little more that 16,500 people. At the turn of the 20th century, it was the home of James L. Dalton who put up the money to start the company based on the invention of a calculating machine by brothers William and Hubert Hopkins in 1902. The Dalton Company machine was the first to use a ten-key keyboard.

The machine pictured was all mechanical, nothing electrical. It proved to be immensely popular and the company prospered until Dalton's death in 1926. The company was then merged into another company that, in 1927, became Remington Rand.

Here is a picture from the internet of the original Dalton manufacturing building in Popular Bluff followed by the cover.

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#23

Post by jimp »

You have some really interesting items.
Thanks for showing them.

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#24

Post by TheCoverCollector »

A recent acquisition for my commercial cover advertising collection. With a 1911 postmark, this cover is one my earliest covers relating to automobiles. I have not found any evidence that Motor Car Supply survived or merged into another company.

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#25

Post by TheCoverCollector »

Beverages advertising covers is a popular collecting area and tend to be pricey. Most are out of range for my collecting budget. However, I was able to purchase these two, one with a Coca Cola corner card and the other for Falstaff Beer. The Coke cover has a small bonus with its slogan cancel for the long-running Oregon Shakespeare Festival and the Falstaff one with its boisterous meter slug "Beer Belongs/"Enjoy It." Amen, second that! Coca Cola is still with us, but Falstaff, alas, has fallen by the way.

According to Wikipedia, Falstaff Brewery was based in St. Louis, Missouri and named after Giuseppe Verdi's opera character. Falstaff began production in 1903 and ceased in 2005. Pabst Brewing owns the rights to Falstaff's brand name. When I lived in Omaha during the 1960s, there was a regional Falstaff brewery there. I remember it as a popular local brand and, truth be known, I quaffed many a bottle of Falstaff as a young man.

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#26

Post by TheCoverCollector »

A recent acquisition to my foods advertising cover collection is this 1904 cover from The American Cereal Co., featuring a colored image of the Quaker of Quaker Oats fame. The Quaker Oats brand was owned by American Cereal for one hundred years (1901-2001) until it was merged into the Pepsi Cola Corporation as one of the products of Quaker Foods and Beverages.

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#27

Post by TheCoverCollector »

Here are two illustrated covers featuring Ralston-Purina's iconic Checkerboard Square logo and its Chow brands. The first is from an Alabama feed store carrying Purina feeds and the second is a cover that carried a promotional offer from Puppy Chow for an animal name tag. Purina animal feeds date back to 1894 while Puppy Chow first came on the market in 1957. It soon became the nation's best selling dog food.

The third advertising cover, while clearly not Purina, is of the same animal feed category -- chicken feed in this instance. This cover has a very bold North Postal Station flag cancel, Type 38b.

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#28

Post by TheCoverCollector »

I collected this recent acquisition for its front and back illustrations depicting Alaskan icons and scenes. The First National Bank of Fairbanks appears to have posted this cover, but there are a couple of oddities about it. First, is the postmark -- the cancel was by the Army and Air Force Postal Service, zip code 98733. Conceivably,, there could have been a branch bank on a military post, but I checked the zip code and 98733 doesn't exist. Possibly discontinued. The other bit of unusualness is the illustrations on the reverse seem to be connected to the Alaska Travel Division in Juneau. Seems odd to me that a bank would use a state travel agency's stationery design for its business envelopes. All-in-all, an interesting, colorful cover with several illustrations that might appeal to topical collectors

The cover design also seemed familiar to me, especially the reverse, so I checked my cover index and turned up the below first-day cover from Alaska's late statehood counterpart, Hawaii. I'm going to watch cover listings from other states to see if similar envelopes turn up.

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#29

Post by guyana1230 »

Love that State of Alaska cover

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#30

Post by TheCoverCollector »

While not strictly an advertising cover, this Alaskan cover from the late territorial period promotes Alaska's status as the last frontier and its merits as a place to visit. Sleetmute, a very small community of less than 100 residents, is in south-central Alaska. It still has its own zip code so it probably still has a post office as well. Franking is two stamps, Sc. 1078-1079, from the 1956 Wildlife Conservation set of three. They paid the correct airmail domestic postage rate of 6 cents per ounce. I collected this cover for its illustration of the Kodiak bear and territorial postmark.

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#31

Post by TheCoverCollector »

Grain elevators are common landmarks along the railroads running through towns and cities of the Great Plains and frequently seen on envelopes of milling companies such as this one from Fort Worth, Texas. The one depicted on the front and back of this Kimbell Milling Company cover is larger than most, but typical in that it is built parallel to a railroad siding where grain cars were loaded or unloaded. The cover also has a nice Fort Worth pictorial centennial cancel.

The Kimbell Milling Company was one of several successful businesses owed and directed by Kay Kimbell of Fort Worth, Texas. It was his fortune and art collection that built and sustains the present day Kimball Art Museum of Fort Worth. Kimbell died in 1964.

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#32

Post by TheCoverCollector »

Writing up covers again and I've added these three to my albums.

The first is an illustrated cover from the Gallagher Manufacturing Company. It made labor saving devices that polished, ground, drilled and buffed metal. The all-in-one machine illustrated on this cover did all of those tasks according to the fine print at the lower left of the envelope. Bernard Gallagher of St. John, New Brunswick, Canada, founded the company circa 1874 in Lynn, Massachusetts. It moved to Braintree, MA, in the late 1930s and apparently went out of business in 1944.
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A bar of Pink Carnation soap manufactured by the Crystal Soap Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, illustrates the second cover. Crystal Soap began in 1872 and sold out to the Palmolive Company in 1919. Not a stamp envelope expert, but this cover looks like an example of Sc. U362 first issued in 1899.
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The third cover's illustration is more familiar to most of us as I believe C and H sugar is still being sold in grocery stores and seen in restaurants. C and H Sugar had its beginnings in 1906 and for years grew its own sugar cane in Hawaii. The C and H stands for California and Hawaii. Its products were marketed as superior because they was refined only from sugar cane, not sugar beets. That is no longer the case and the brand is now owned by Domino Sugar. The cover is from a sugar broker and its market report sent to subscribers, one of which was probably the addressee.
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#33

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Two covers from Minnesota candy manufacturers. The first from Trudeau Candies illustrating one of its leading products from the 1930s, the Seven-Up bar. The Seven-Up bar was formed by seven pockets each filled with different flavors such as Brazil nut, buttercream, butterscotch, caramel, cherry, coconut, fudge, mint, or nougat. Trudeau sold its product line to Pearson's Candies which discontinued the Seven-Up bar in 1979 because of high production costs and trade mark disputes with the bottled product of the same name.
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Gurley's Chocolate (or Candy) Company had its beginning circa 1919 and successfully produced a line of boxed candies such as chocolate-covered cherries, nuts and nougats known as Hidden Treasures, along with lemon drops, chocolate mints and a candy bar named Big Liz. Gurley's sold its product line to Fanny Farmer in 1936.
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#34

Post by TheCoverCollector »

Bread and butter covers, about which I have little information. I have found no information that any of these businesses are still active. It appears that Jordan Bakers, Inc., was purchased by Sunbeam Bakeries circa 1948, but I've not found evidence that this company is still in Topeka.

The creameries have also disappeared. Lakeville Creamery was founded in 1897, and Bennett Creamery in 1905, both appeared to be still active in the 1950s, but no information beyond that.

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#35

Post by TheCoverCollector »

A couple of chicken-related covers that I acquired in a lot of advertising covers. When I was a boy growing up on a farm in Iowa, my mother used to buy two or three dozen baby chicks every spring for eating and egg laying from a hatchery in our county seat town. As I recall, baby chicks were also sold by mail and shipped by railroad express or even by the railway mail service. No hatcheries in the town I currently live in, but I believe chicks still may be purchased at some farm supply and fee stores.

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#36

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A couple of new illustrated advertising cover for my "Foods" collection. The first, advertising Ashton's Salt from the Francis Moulton Company. No information about Francis Moulton, but Ashton's Salt may have come from Ashton's Salt Mill in Geddes, New York. Nothing about W. L. Knorr Bakery and Confectioners Supplies other than it apparently is not related in any way to contemporary Knorr food products.

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#37

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Two more illustrated advertising covers. The first from New York Produce Review and American Creamery, a monthly magazine containing recipes and helpful tips for using produce and dairy produces. This magazine began in 1897 and looks like it continued until 1937. The cover is postmarked July 14, 1905 and is franked with Sc. 319, the 2 cents carmine Geo Washington definitive.
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Ultra-Life Laboratories apparently produced supplements for animal feeds, of which a sack is illustrated on this 1938 cover. I found one reference to the company as late of 1964, but the trail ended there. This cover is a 6 cents stamped airmail evelope, Sc. UC3, first issued in 1934.

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#38

Post by TheCoverCollector »

A recent commercial cover acquisition with a philatelic connection. This is a letter from an elementary teacher to the American Philatelic Society collected for the different and unusual pencil illustration that is part of the return address. My guess is that Mrs.Bartlett was requesting stamps to be used in her classroom as an instructional aid or, possibly, for a stamp club at the school. Not much philatelic value to this cover, but I like it for the pencil illustration and its philatelic connection.

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#39

Post by TheCoverCollector »

Where have all the posters gone? Here are a couple of illustrated advertising covers. Perhaps, they will prime the pump!

From my food collection a cover front from Mother's Oats. Mother's began in the early 1880s and was the product of The Great Western Cereal Company. Quaker Oats acquired the brand in 1911. Mother's was known for its crockery and tableware as premiums for buying the cereal. Examples may be seen on eBay.
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The second is a cover purchased for my Iowa collection. Martin G.Lee founded Lee Broom & Duster Company in Davenport in 1870. It appears that the company continued into the 1920s, but I found no reference after that decade.
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#40

Post by TheCoverCollector »

Generally, I don't keep and write-up two covers of the same design. I made an exception in this case for the markings on the second cover below. The design of this cover was done by the Puerto Rico Institute of Tourism and it looks like they may have been distributed at no cost to mailers. It is an attractive design depicting the merits of Puerto Rico, along with the island's activities and products. It was for the design that I bought the first cover postmarked in 1940. Both are personal covers of non-philatelic origins.

I acquired the second cover for the censor markings and tape and its origin from a soldier stationed at the U.S. Army Air Field at Borinquen. It is also a curious cover in that it is marked for air mail service in two places, but was not franked with sufficient air mail postage. It is possible that the sender reasoned that since surface mail for military personnel was "free," so he could add 3 cents postage to make the 6 cents air mail rate. I wonder if the cover was, indeed, flown out of Puerto Rico. Borinquen air field was built to serve as a base for reconnaissance aircraft to guard the approach of the Caribbean Sea from the north and east during WW II. After the war, it became Ramey Air Force Base.

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